Google Aims to Speed Up the Web with SPDY Protocol

SPDY and HTTP packet loss graph
Image courtesy of Chromium Projects

SPDY and HTTP packet loss graph
Image courtesy of Chromium Projects
Google has been quietly working on a new protocol for Web traffic that would augment and speed up HTTP, a protocol that is now over 20 years old. Called SPDY — not an acronym, but short for “speedy” — it is currently part of the Chromium umbrella of open-source projects and its main aim is to reduce the load time of web pages.

SPDY does and focuses on the following: compresses the stream using gzip, encrypts the transmission, supports unlimited connections (unlike HTTP’s max of 6 in certain browsers), and allows for the server to communicate with client without a client request, which is perfect for our Web 2.0 AJAX-populated world.

As this may sound like Greek to many of us, here’s the bottom line: potentially 44 to 64% improvement in page load times!

Currently, only the Google Chrome browser supports SPDY and only Google websites use this technology, but stay tuned for other sites to start using this as SPDY is open-source.

via Conceivably Tech